Seasonal Warming Shelter

Good Samaritan Haven operates two Seasonal Warming Shelters to help Washington County meet the increased need for shelter during the winter months.

overflow

Hedding Seasonal Warming Shelter (Barre)

Good Samaritan Haven operates a fourteen bed seasonal shelter at the Hedding United Methodist Church every winter from November to April. Guests are provided a cot, a hot shower, toiletries and a healthy meal nightly. Case management services are available for guests who want support with permanent housing, employment, mental health, recovery, or other community resources.

The Hedding Seasonal Warming Shelter opened November 1, 2017 for the season and serves adult males. Hours of operations are 9:00pm-7:00am. To schedule an intake please call Good Samaritan Haven at 802-479-2294.

Bethany Seasonal Warming Shelter (Montpelier)

Good Samaritan Haven recently received funding to expand seasonal shelter capacity for the 2017/2018 winter. A new twenty-bed Seasonal Warming Shelter opened November 15, 2017 at the Bethany Church in Montpelier. Guests are provided a cot, a hot shower, toiletries and a healthy meal nightly. Case management services are available for guests who want support with permanent housing, employment, mental health, recovery, or other community resources.

The Bethany Seasonal Warming Shelter will operate from November 15, 2017 – April 15, 2018 and will serve adult males and females. Hours of operations are 8:30pm-8:30am. To schedule an intake please call Good Samaritan Haven at 802-479-2294. Intakes can also be completed at Another Way from Monday through Friday, 9:00am-5:00pm, located at 125 Barre St.

The Seasonal Warming Shelters are a state-funded, “community based alternative” to address homelessness in Washington County.

Good Samaritan Haven’s Seasonal Warming Shelters are funded by the Vermont Office of Economic Opportunity’s Housing Opportunity Program Grant (HOP). They are an innovative “community-based alternative” to General Assistance motel vouchers. Reliance on motels as emergency housing has been extremely costly for the state –  Vermont spent $4.3 million in FY15 on GA motel vouchers. More importantly, while motels provide a temporary roof overhead, they are not good public policy for reducing homelessness. Read more here.